Dallas Cowboys History | The Beginning

  

Dallas Cowboys History | The Beginning

Dallas Cowboys History | The Beginning. In 1960, the Dallas Cowboys became the NFL's first and new successful team since the collapse of the All America Football Conference. Clint Murchison Jr. owned the majority of the new team and his first order of business was to hire Tex Schramm as general manager, Tom Landry as head coach and Gil Brandt as personal director of players.  


This trio was destined for almost unprecedented success in the professional football world but the "glory years" did not come easily. Playing in the historic Cotton Bowl, the 1960 Cowboys had to settle for a tying record in 12 games, and the Dallas couldn't break that performance until their sixth season in 1965. But in 1966, the Cowboys started with an NFL record. , where they achieved a mark of 20 consecutive seasons with a winning record.  


Dallas won its first two division championships in 1966 and 1967 but lost to the Green Bay Packers in the NFL championship game each year. Similar   losses in the following seasons' playoffs were followed by a second 16-13 loss to Baltimore in Super Bowl V. The Cowboys were branded "a good team that couldn't win the big games."  


But they forgot about that loss and the following year they reached Super Bowl VI again where they defeated the Miami Dolphins 24-3. The Cowboys reached the Super Bowl three more times from 1975 to 1978. Dallas lost to Pittsburgh in extremely close games in Super Bowls X and XIII but defeated the Denver Broncos 27-10 in Super Bowl XII. For glorious seventies years,  


In 1967, Murchison announced that the Cowboys would build their own stadium in the suburb of Irving, Texas. On October 24, 1971, a new era in Professional Football began for Dallas, when Texas Stadium was open to 65,024 spectators.  


The Cowboys of the 1970s and early 1980s were known as "Team America", a team that was always one step ahead of any other club, reinforcing the team's image with promotions, such as the Dallas Cowboys. Newsweekly a weekly magazine that had a circulation of 100,000 copies, sales of Cowboys merchandise, clothing and the appearance of the famous Dallas Cowboys cheerleaders.  


The Cowboys suffered their first losing season in 1986 after two decades and fell heavily in 1988 with a 3-13 record. In 1984, HR "Bum" Bright, who had bought the Cowboys from Murchison, in 1989 sold the team to Jerry Jones. Jones appointed University of Miami coach Jimmy Johnson to replace Landry who finished his career with 270 wins, third in coaching history.  


Johnson's first team was only able to win once in 16 games, but with some trade deals and subtle picks from the annual NFL Draft, the Cowboys quickly returned to championship games in Super Bowl XXVII in Jerry Jones' fourth season. as owner of the team. Dallas continued with a second consecutive world title in Super Bowl XXVIII. In March 1994, Barry Switzer, a college coach, replaced Johnson and became the Cowboys' third coach. The victories continued as Switzer, known as "the Nineties Team" won their third Super Bowl in four years after a 27-17 win over the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XXX. In 1998, Chan Gailey replaced Switzer as the Cowboys' head coach


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